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Solomon Nasser, Homely Con Artist, Swindles $150,000 from Wealthy Ladies in New York

By Pete Kotz in fraud
Monday, February 1, 2010 at 2:44 pm

Solomon-Nasser_150.jpg
​In the movies, the con man who swindles wealthy women is always a Pierce Brosnan type, a white tuxedoed dandy with a debonair fleck of foreign accent. Solomon Nasser, by contrast, looks not much better than the trolls commonly found in children's fables...

But he still managed to rip-off the wealthy single women of New York.

Pierce-Brosnan.jpg
Isn't a con artist supposed to have bullet proof hair and wear a tuxedo even when he goes fishing?
​According to police, he used match.com, plentyoffish.com and other dating sites to lure his prey. He claimed to be a wealthy man caught in a nasty custody battle with his ex-wife. His bank accounts were frozen, which is why he coincidentally had no money.

But if his looks weren't the kind found on silver screen, his fictitious stories of status were even worse. He claimed to be an admiral in the U.S. Navy, a ranking official in the Defense Department, a former adviser to President George W. Bush, a commander in Iraq and a corporate board member for Sikorsky Helicopters.

And if that wasn't enough bullshit, he further claimed to be a multimillionaire who got his doctorate from MIT at age 22 and held a whopping 80 patents for his many acts of genius. Somehow, the finer moneyed ladies of New York believed this, and were willing to lend a hand when he asked for loans to get by.

One upper West Side artist gave him $114,000. Another woman kicked him $25,000. In all, he managed to pull in $150,000 from unsuspecting ladies before he was caught.

He's now charged with a few pounds of crime, including larceny and fraud, and faces up to 15 years if convicted.

The moral of the story: If you live in the heartland and are tired of being derided by the coastal elite as a rube from Flyover Country, consider yourself vindicated. No Midwesterner would ever fall for a con this remedial -- especially if he never bothered to buy you dinner at Bonanza.

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