Search Results: Houston Press (701)

houston-press-feat_img3_31Houston Press

Phillip Garcia Jr. was only celebrating a Houston Rockets win with some drinks and grub at a restaurant called Bombshells in southeast Houston — but he didn’t make it home after an off-duty cop shot him to death in the parking lot.

That’s according to the civil rights lawsuit his parents, Sonia Garcia and Phillip Garcia Sr., are filing against the City of Houston and the officer who killed their son, asking for an unspecified amount of damages.

abuse-cover-finalJustin Renteria

On the phone, the former Houston priest didn’t recognize the name of the 13-year-old boy he molested in 1978.

So much time has passed since that third encounter with the boy, in the Town & Country Village movie theater in Memorial City, where the priest slid his hand into the boy’s jeans and masturbated him. It’s hard to keep track of these things, and besides, the priest says, it’s old news.

Salisbury was one of more than a dozen priests named in a November 2016 press release by the local chapter of Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, as part of the group’s push for the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston to publicly identify, for the first time, all of its priests who’d been accused or convicted of crimes against children. Our cover story on the survivors .

img_0210_1_In a rare move, District Attorney Devon Anderson intervened in a misdemeanor case to personally dismiss a DWI charge against prominent Houston defense attorney Tony Buzbee, the Houston Press discovered Monday morning.

In a statement to the Press, Anderson said the reason she decided to dismiss the case was that it was “the right thing to do.”

“He qualified for pre-trial intervention and completed all of the requirements typically mandated for a first offender DWI defendant,” Anderson said. “He did not contribute to my campaign in 2016 cycle.”

Yet even though Anderson’s own DWI diversion program requirements state that it is a one-year program, the case was dismissed after only eight months. 

rapisthpdHouston Police Department

Houston police believe a 30-year-old man being held on two sexual assault charges may have committed at least six sexual assaults in southeast Houston since May.

David E. Beard has been in Harris County Jail since October 5, after two women identified him as their attacker, according to a Houston Police Department press release. Beard allegedly had a very peculiar M.O.

6120199762_c1a20bf7cd_zAndrew Malone/Flickr

A former Medicare provider who owned an ambulance company has been found guilty of engaging in organized crime after deceiving dozens of mentally disabled patients and attempting to steal more than $1.3 million through fraudulent Medicare and Medicaid programs, the Texas Attorney General’s Office announced Tuesday.

A Harris County judge sentenced the 44-year-old Houston man, Chimaroke Echenwune, to 30 years in prison for the elaborate theft.

screen-shot-2016-11-21-at-8-17-55-amScreenshot

What should a police officer do when a handcuffed prisoner spits on him?

Yell at him and spit back? Punch him in the face? Slam his head against a metal door frame, then choke him from behind in a neck nerve-hold, causing him to collapse to the floor and convulse?

In the eyes of one Houston police officer now being sued in federal court, apparently Option 3 is the way to go.

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3311982761_58242bfe35_zRobert & Pat Rogers/Flickr

A Houston mother has been charged with endangering a child after investigators found she was homeschooling her daughter in a house full of wild animals — including a tiger, three tiger cubs, a cougar, a fox, a skunk and several monkeys.

An investigation was opened after a California man claimed Trisha Meyer swindled him out of $3,000 — the cost of an exotic Savannah kitten he had purchased from Meyer but that Meyer never shipped to him. Meyer has also been charged with felony theft in relation to the incident.

Here’s how they caught her.

12376173_10207181448388555_2397075597732748251_n-1Courtesy of Kris Smith

Neither Kris Smith nor his attorney understand how talking on the phone on a sidewalk next to a fast-food restaurant parking lot ever became a punishable crime, but one night this past December, Smith found himself in jail because of it.

Smith was walking along Westheimer in Montrose, on the way to his girlfriend’s house, when the phone rang. His employer was calling, and so to get away from the bustling traffic, Smith walked toward the Burger King where it was a little quieter. Midway through his brief phone conversation, a police cruiser pulled into the parking lot right in front of a man who appeared homeless, sitting at the very back of the lot. Police got out to arrest the man. Not wanting to deal with the ruckus, Smith started to walk away — when a cop yelled out to him, “Stop. Come over here,” Smith remembers.

After his arrest, he was jeered because of his gender identity.

3090392251_911be4dfaf_zScott Davidson/Flickr

Ain’t nobody got time to handle emergency phone calls in which some people could possibly die — or at least that’s the opinion of one 911 operator who is now facing criminal charges for hanging up on thousands of panicking callers.

Crenshanda Williams has been charged with interference with an emergency phone call after an investigation by police and the Harris County District Attorney’s Office Public Integrity Unit revealed Williams was consistently blowing off callers from October 2015 through March 2016. Williams’s superiors started to grow suspicious after noticing that Williams had logged an unusual number of calls lasting shorter than 20 seconds (superiors are notified any time that happens, according to court records). Here’s what she actually tells people.

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