Author Meagan Flynn

Screen Shot 2017-02-20 at 8.37.31 AMSomething unusual caught the attention of a Harris County Precinct 1 monitoring surveillance video of a popular illegal trash dumping site on Thursday — a man beating a child with a belt.

For five minutes, the man struck the boy with a belt at least 62 times in the head, shoulders, legs and buttocks, deputies said. Some of the blows knocked the seven-year-old to the ground. The man held the boy upright, like a rag doll, by holding the child with one hand while swinging the belt with the other.

drb2Screenshot/Diagnosed TV show

The Texas Medical Board’s legal staff on Wednesday issued a proposed order that would place controversial cancer doctor Stanislaw Burzynski on probation and force him to pay $360,000 in penalties and more than $20,000 in restitution for violating standards of care in his treatment of patients between 2009 and 2013.

The proposed order, which will be voted on March 3, claims that Burzynski aided and abetted the unlicensed practice of medicine; failed to obtain informed consent; and failed to maintain adequate patient records. It also alleges that Burzynski also failed to disclose his ownership interest in the pharmacy located inside his clinic’s building. Burznski had been treating terminally ill cancer patients for 40 years.

8673156388_9d34806c0e_z (1)Miranda Nelson/Flickr

District Attorney Kim Ogg and heads of local law enforcement announced Thursday that, starting March 1, all police agencies in Harris County will no longer arrest people caught with four ounces or less of marijuana, and the DA’s office will no longer be prosecuting those cases.

The remarkable move, which Ogg had championed throughout her 2016 campaign, pushes the third largest county in the nation to the forefront of marijuana reform in places where it is still illegal. Harris County will join only the Brooklyn County District Attorney’s Office in New York in choosing to divert misdemeanor marijuana defendants away from jail entirely, saving taxpayers millions of dollars and saving thousands of people the lifelong burden of a criminal record. Here are the details.

Screen Shot 2017-02-01 at 6.13.49 PMScreenshot/Twitter

A group of white nationalists that don’t think they’re white supremacists traipsed around the Rice University campus and placed at least four “recruitment” fliers on trees and traffic-light boxes as part of their mission to save white people from the genocide they see on the horizon.

According to Rice University police, students began reporting the fliers and chattering about them on Twitter. One flier, signed by the American Vanguard, said, “We have a right to exist” with a picture of white people’s faces, and another said “Defending your people is a social duty, not an anti-social crime” with a picture of mom and child, according to Rice spokesman B.J. Almond. Others posted at Texas universities including Texas State and the University of Texas – Dallas drew inspiration from President Donald Trump.

churchmovesJustin Renteria

Since at least 1947, when a religious community called the Servants of the Paraclete opened one of the first treatment centers for priests grappling with pedophilia and substance abuse, dioceses have often warehoused problematic priests.

The “rehab” facility closest to Houston is Splendora’s Shalom Center, whose website states, “We genuinely seek to create a spirit of Gospel compassion, a nonjudgmental atmosphere and a safe environment where healing and growth can happen.”

Here’s how it’s done.

unnamed_5_1_Houston Police Department

Surprise: Yet another smoke shop selling the synthetic drug kush under the counter has been sued by the Harris County Attorney’s Office, with a judge granting a temporary restraining order against Texas Tobacco and Smoke Shop on Wednesday.

In the same way that virtually every smoke shop in the area gets busted (haven’t they figured this out yet?), an undercover police officer came into the store and asked for some kush, which he found misleadingly packaged in bags saying “not for human consumption.” The store’s owner, Sayed Ali, even offered to sell him some “Dro,” a street name for hydroponic marijuana.

houston-press-feat_img3_31Houston Press

Phillip Garcia Jr. was only celebrating a Houston Rockets win with some drinks and grub at a restaurant called Bombshells in southeast Houston — but he didn’t make it home after an off-duty cop shot him to death in the parking lot.

That’s according to the civil rights lawsuit his parents, Sonia Garcia and Phillip Garcia Sr., are filing against the City of Houston and the officer who killed their son, asking for an unspecified amount of damages.

abuse-cover-finalJustin Renteria

On the phone, the former Houston priest didn’t recognize the name of the 13-year-old boy he molested in 1978.

So much time has passed since that third encounter with the boy, in the Town & Country Village movie theater in Memorial City, where the priest slid his hand into the boy’s jeans and masturbated him. It’s hard to keep track of these things, and besides, the priest says, it’s old news.

Salisbury was one of more than a dozen priests named in a November 2016 press release by the local chapter of Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, as part of the group’s push for the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston to publicly identify, for the first time, all of its priests who’d been accused or convicted of crimes against children. Our cover story on the survivors .

paulwall_dec23Eric Sauseda

Houston rapper Paul Wall and Baby Bash might as well volunteer to be DD’s this New Year’s Eve, because on Tuesday, a judge ordered that they not drink alcohol or do any drugs as part of their bond conditions. Just before Christmas, the rappers and several others were arrested and charged with engaging in organized criminal activity and possession of THC with intent to deliver, both felonies.

Each told judges they would not pass their drug tests if made to pee in a cup.

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