Browsing: Bizarre

berthalazcanoCourtesy of the family of Bertha Lazcano

It wasn’t until the next morning, well after the crash, that Bertha Lazcano’s family found out what happened to their mother and wife.

The 58-year-old mother of four and grandmother of two was driving home on U.S. 290 the evening of September 11 when the truck in the lane next to her hit a construction barrier. The pickup went airborne and landed on top of Lazcano’s Toyota RAV4, killing her instantly.

3090392251_911be4dfaf_zScott Davidson/Flickr

Ain’t nobody got time to handle emergency phone calls in which some people could possibly die — or at least that’s the opinion of one 911 operator who is now facing criminal charges for hanging up on thousands of panicking callers.

Crenshanda Williams has been charged with interference with an emergency phone call after an investigation by police and the Harris County District Attorney’s Office Public Integrity Unit revealed Williams was consistently blowing off callers from October 2015 through March 2016. Williams’s superiors started to grow suspicious after noticing that Williams had logged an unusual number of calls lasting shorter than 20 seconds (superiors are notified any time that happens, according to court records). Here’s what she actually tells people.

carlos-rodriguez-half-headed-manMiami-Dade Department of Corrections

Let’s get this over with: The photo above is real, the man is alive, and his name is Carlos Rodriguez. He is 31 years old and goes by the nickname “Half Head,” and the reason is obvious. Half Head lives in Miami and got into a car accident when he was high some years ago. This forced doctors to remove part of his brain and then fuse his skull back together.

So, without a full brain, Half Head seems to have issues with impulse control and can’t keep himself out of trouble. Today he’s back in jail.

On Monday, Half Head was arrested for two felony counts of attempted murder and one count of first-degree arson, according to the Miami-Dade Department of Corrections. 


When Martin County Police arrived Monday to find 19-year-old Austin Harrouff standing over the bodies of two bleeding victims while violently biting one man’s face, police first fired stun guns. When those didn’t work, cops unleashed a dog. When that didn’t work, three officers pulled Harrouff off the man and took him to jail — alive.

Some activists are drawing a stark contrast between that approach and those employed in other recent police actions in South Florida. Take, for instance, the July incident when North Miami cops sent a SWAT team with military-style assault rifles to surround unarmed African-American behavior therapist Charles Kinsey, who was trying to help an autistic man “armed” with a toy car. Police shot Kinsey in the leg, although video showed him lying on the ground with his hands up.

Critics say Harrouff’s treatment highlights the vast disparity between how whites and blacks are treated by police. After all, Florida cops were able to take calm, measured steps to subdue a white, possibly drug-addled cannibal armed with a knife and no shirt, but somehow felt it was necessary to shoot Kinsey — who was cooperating and unarmed — from afar.


In 2013, Austin Harrouff was starring as a defensive tackle at Suncoast Community High, a Palm Beach County school ranked among Newsweek’s ten best schools in America at least eight times in the past decade. He’d also been taking advanced-placement classes in the school’s International Baccalaureate program.

So it’s anyone’s guess how he ended up in a Martin County garage yesterday, chewing off parts of a stranger’s face after killing the man and his wife and stabbing their neighbor.

22513614321_df5f786802_z_1_N i c o l a/Flickr

Seventeen-year-old Blake wouldn’t necessarily consider his poolside lifeguard job to be a fun-in-the-sun type of summer gig. He’s had to rescue drowning kids whose parents instead yelled at him for pulling them out of the water. He’s been dehydrated. He’s had to stay late putting strong-smelling chemicals in the water so you don’t have to deal with other people’s urine contaminating the pool.

But to Blake, as an employee of A-Beautiful Pools, the worst part of the job is being cheated out of money. (Blake asked that we give him a pseudonym since he still works for the company.) It’s so bad, in fact, that he’s pretty sure he has lost between $400 and $500 the past two summers as a result of strict, punitive measures he says the company takes to make damn sure its employees to show up on time and never miss a shift.

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