Browsing: Fugitives

willyfalconOrange County Jail/HistoryMiami

Twenty-six years ago, the feds busted Miami’s biggest smuggling operation of the Cocaine Cowboys era: a $2 billion pipeline run by high-school pals Willy Falcon and Sal Magluta. It would take another decade of contentious court battles before the pair was finally convicted, wrapping up one of the nation’s most massive drug cases.

But there was always a loose end. Just before the two were indicted in 1991, Gustavo “Taby” Falcon, Willy’s brother, vanished. He hadn’t been seen since — until yesterday, when federal agents found him in a rented home in Kissimmee. Falcon was nabbed as he returned from a bike ride with his wife and hauled off to Orange County Jail in a neon Nike shirt.
dayonte-resiles-featureIllustration by Matthew Billington

The blond corpse floats in a blood-filled bathtub.The face bobs just barely above the surface. She wears nothing but a thong. Her hands are tied with a ribbed fabric sash. The feet are bound with a beige electrical cord. Stab wounds dot her body.
Outside, egrets graze next to the canal surrounding Davie’s WestRidge development, where homes typically sell for more than $1 million. It’s one of several virtually identical subdivisions on Nob Hill Road with names such as Ridgeview Lake, Long Lake Estates, and Long Lake Ranches. All are hidden behind tall hedges and fronted by imposing guard towers. None of the residents has reported a break-in or anything else suspicious. It seems like just another serene Monday.Despite the chaos, the family dog is fast asleep.

When police arrive a little after noon, they learn the 59-year-old blonde in the bathtub is Jill Halliburton Su, whose great-uncle, Erle Halliburton, founded the oil company that still bears his name. At the time of his death in 1957, he was one of the ten richest people in the United States.

But nothing is missing from the house, so there’s no explanation for the brutal murder.

The cops have no way of knowing yet that their search for a killer will lead to many dead ends and only two real suspects: Justin Su, the murdered woman’s only son, and Dayonte Resiles, a young man with a history of burglarizing homes. Both 20 years old at the time of the killing, they hadn’t met despite growing up only 15 miles apart. One is the child of an heiress and a renowned termite scientist, the other the son of a Walmart clerk and a Haitian vodou priest. Neither has a clear motive.

On the basis of some questionable DNA evidence, Resiles will be charged with the murder. He will eventually engineer a brilliant courtroom escape, helped by a handful of teenagers with little more than high-school educations. They will somehow outsmart the police for nearly a week while Resiles is on the run.

And now, two years after the suburban housewife’s death, no one knows for sure who killed her or why.

anibal_mustelierMiami-Dade County Department of Corrections

When the U.S. Marshals issued an arrest warrant for Anibal Mustelier back in 1995, Mustelier had a thick head of bushy brown hair sprouting atop his head. His face was unblemished, and light stubble gave his face a youthful glow.

After Mustelier, 66, was arrested on Sunday, his latest mugshot shows that his hair has faded to gray, and his goatee has turned shades of salt and pepper. His cheeks have sunken, and wrinkles snake across his forehead.

He had, after all, spent 26 years in hiding, after working as an alleged “contract killer” and hitman for Colombian drug cartels, including Pablo Escobar’s Medellin Cartel. Some even linked Mustelier, also known as “The Ghost,” to Fidel Castro himself.

According to a 2001 Sun-Sentinel report, Mustelier was “feared even by the toughest drug smugglers of Miami’s Cocaine Cowboy days, but at the same time he was an esteemed professional.”

But according to arrest reports obtained by New Times, Hialeah police finally caught the 5’4″ Mustelier after police say he was caught executing a bungled armed robbery on a Hialeah bank.

fisher-robert-age-enhanced-3FBI

It has been 15 years since Robert Fisher allegedly butchered his wife and two children before blowing up the family’s Scottsdale home.

After more than a decade on the FBI’s “Ten Most Wanted Fugitives” list, Fisher has yet to be apprehended. But the 15-year anniversary, coupled with recent media coverage, has fueled a slew of new tips that investigators say might finally lead to his capture.

dayonte_resilesBroward Sheriff's Office/Georgia Guercio via Wikimedia Commons

Seven days after he slipped out of shackles and left the Broward County Courthouse through a back door, allegedly with the help of at least seven others, accused murderer Dayonte Resiles was marched back into the Fort Lauderdale jail not long before dawn this morning.

Surrounded by a SWAT team at a West Palm Beach motel, Resiles surrendered peacefully late Wednesday night; thus ended one of the most intensive manhunts in South Florida history.

“South Florida is a safer place,” declared Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel.

fisher-robert-age-enhanced-3

Robert Fisher, one of the most wanted men in the country, still is believed to be on the loose, 15 years after he allegedly slaughtered his wife and two children before blowing up his Scottsdale home.

A week before Fisher turns 55, Scottsdale police and the FBI released a series of new, age-progressed photos of the accused killer, hoping to spark new leads.

 

Alex Washington Galveston County Jail

Alex Washington

Late Saturday, around 11:20 p.m., accused bank robber Alex Washington walked on out of the jail by pretending to be another inmate who had just secured a $100,000 bond; jailers didn’t notice he was missing until an hour later. Washington and the other inmate — who had, coincidentally, been booked on identity theft charges — switched identities by swapping wristbands, similar to those used at hospitals, Sheriff Henry Trochesset told the Houston Press.

martin_gottesfeldPhoto via Facebook

Martin Gottesfeld’s hands apparently weren’t as nimble with a sailboat’s jib and spinnaker as they were with his keyboard. The 31-year-old is suspected of masterminding a high-profile hacking of a Massachusetts medical center’s computer system. When those criminal allegations emerged, he tried to flee, police say. He and his wife were traveling in a sailboat and were close to the coast of Cuba this week when they ran into trouble. A distress call was answered by a Disney cruise ship, and the rescue tipped off the feds to Gottesfeld’s whereabouts.

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