sean.crumpler.linkedin.800Breakfast reading from the Voice Media Empire: Sean Crumpler, who pleaded guilty in March to multiple sex-trafficking counts related to underage boys living at what’s been characterized as an orgy house, has now been sentenced to fifty years in prison. In asking for this lengthy punishment, prosecutors rejected any suggestion that Crumpler was taking part in an acceptable alternative lifestyle, and so did the judge in the case, who branded his actions “despicable.” Westword has the story.

tommy_1Breakfast reading from the Voice Media Empire: Caldwell recounts the harrowing experience of being taken hostage by rebels in Kyrgyzstan in 2000 along with his then-girlfriend, Beth Rodden. The two were on a climbing expedition when they unexpectedly found themselves in the middle of a war; they had to find a way to escape their captors after six days of no food or water. Westword has the story.

mark.ellis_1_Breakfast reading from the Voice Media Empire: Just what does it take to get a murky child sex-assault conviction overturned? An admission of perjury by a key prosecution witness? Expert forensic analysis of the only piece of physical evidence in the case, which suggests that it may not be evidence at all? A ruling by a federal judge that your lawyer’s efforts in your defense didn’t meet constitutional standards and that you should be given a new trial or released? Westword has the story.

christian.gulzow.one.the.undertakersBreakfast reading from the Voice Media EmpireChristian Gulzow, the man arrested in a horrific fatal stabbing, is described by two members of The Undertakers, a metal band with which he was once associated, as obsessed with demons, weapons and musical fame that was beyond his ability. They also say that after ending their friendship with him, Gulzow reacted by unleashing violent warnings that are even more disturbing given the current allegations against him. Westword has the story.

philippa.mccully.two.surveillanceBreakfast reading from the Voice Media Empire: College coed Philippa “Pippa” McCully’s lawsuit claims that she was badly injured during a bizarre excessive-force episode at a county jail and then refused medical treatment for a knee injury severe enough to startle the team doctor for the Miami Dolphins. Video of the incident appears to confirm much of McCully’s account. But her attorney says the case has dragged on for more than a year in part because it took place during the administration of a former sheriff whose indictment on felony charges that include extortion and official misconduct arising from an alleged sex scandal involving at leat three employees has complicated the situation immeasurably. Westword has the story.

christof.gulzow.younowBreakfast reading from the Voice Media Empire:The man identified by police as Christian Gulzow, the suspect in a gruesome fatal stabbing, is known online as both Christöf Gülzow and Nürüm Bellüm, a death-metal vocalist. His various social-media platforms feature multiple images of him with white makeup and gloves sporting long tips of the sort allegedly worn by the killer in the case, and a video on his Instagram account includes violent and bloody knifings. Westword has the story.

eric.jarrin.one.facebookBreakfast reading from the Voice Media Empire: After some but not all of Eric Jarrin’s marijuana was stolen, the Colorado resident reported what had happened. But because the crime took place in Wyoming, which has some of the strongest anti-cannabis laws in the country, the police officers who responded didn’t bother going after the thief. Instead, they promptly arrested Jarrin and fellow Colorado pal Christopher Rathe, whose actions raise an important question: Were the pair too stoned to remember they were in a state where pot is illegal? Westword has the story.

feature-arrestBreakfast reading from the Voice Media Empire: The sovereign movement is a catch-all label for people who believe they are subject only to common law, and therefore not subject to all the statutory laws of the U.S. government at its various levels — federal, state and local. Sometimes calling themselves “constitutionalists” or “freemen,” individuals who subscribe to a sovereign ideology often don’t believe they are required to follow any regulations drafted and passed by politicians — things like tax codes or driver’s license rules — because the U.S. government has been corrupted and sovereigns are not under contract to adhere to all of its laws. Westword has the story.