littlehavanaMiami-Dade Corrections

Going into debt with a drug dealer is never a fantastic game plan. But police say one Miami man who stiffed his connection out of $500 worth of narcotics ended up suffering far worse payback than he ever could have imagined.

The victim, whom police haven’t identified, ended up kidnapped at gunpoint, locked on a Little Havana back patio for four days, and then shot in the head. Amazingly, he survived the ordeal, and police have now arrested four people behind the bloody payback, including a 21-year-old woman who cops say pulled the trigger
willyfalconOrange County Jail/HistoryMiami

Twenty-six years ago, the feds busted Miami’s biggest smuggling operation of the Cocaine Cowboys era: a $2 billion pipeline run by high-school pals Willy Falcon and Sal Magluta. It would take another decade of contentious court battles before the pair was finally convicted, wrapping up one of the nation’s most massive drug cases.

But there was always a loose end. Just before the two were indicted in 1991, Gustavo “Taby” Falcon, Willy’s brother, vanished. He hadn’t been seen since — until yesterday, when federal agents found him in a rented home in Kissimmee. Falcon was nabbed as he returned from a bike ride with his wife and hauled off to Orange County Jail in a neon Nike shirt.

peyton.knowlton.gofundmeBreakfast reading from the Voice Media Empire: Kyle Couch, 21, a onetime high school and college athlete who pleaded guilty to driving-related crimes in the 2016 accident that killed eight-year-old Peyton Knowlton, has been sentenced to a maximum of 150 days in jail plus two years of probation. The punishment was meted out after prosecutors dropped a vehicular-homicide charge that fell apart. Why?  Westword has the story.

suicidal.prisoner.jailer.thinkstockBreakfast reading from the Voice Media Empire: If you’re mentally ill and undergo a crisis that causes a disruption at a public place in six states, you can be legally put in jail, even if you haven’t committed a crime. And an attempt change this rule in one state last year was driven by law enforcers who wanted the hold time for innocent sufferers to be extended, not eliminated. Westword has the story.

corey-jones-photoCourtesy of Corey Jones' Family

Corey Jones almost certainly died without knowing that the man who fired the six shots at him October 18, 2015, was an on-duty cop. In the hours to come, Palm Beach Gardens Police Officer Nouman Raja would insist that he had identified himself as law enforcement, that Jones had been pointing a gun at him when he fired the fatal shots, that he had no choice but to shoot to kill.

Investigators and prosecutors likely would have believed him — except the AT&T Roadside Assistance call captured what really happened. With that rare, independent record of a fatal police shooting, Palm Beach County prosecutors did the extraordinary: They criminally charged an officer for killing someone in the line of duty.

jesse-lenz-floating-cocaineThe untold story of Key Largo’s most brutal homicide in 25 years shines a light on a drugged-out Upper Keys underbelly worthy of a Bloodlines subplot and reveals a surprising truth: Every year, dozens of Florida fishermen find square groupers — packages of marijuana or cocaine, sometimes worth millions of dollars — drifting in the ocean. Then they have to choose: Call the Coast Guard? Or chase the promise of riches far beyond what a fishing boat can provide, risking prison time — or, in some cases, unimaginable bloodshed.

kinseyYouTube

Moments before North Miami Police Officer Jonathan Aledda shot unarmed behavioral technician Charles Kinsey last July 18, another cop on the scene warned there was no gun, only a toy.

After the shooting, an assistant chief repeatedly lied to the police chief, and City Manager Larry Spring ignored vital evidence.

Moreover, the crime scene was mismanaged, and the police department and city government were in disarray and plagued by infighting.

Those are among the stunning revelations in an hourlong audio recording of North Miami Police Chief Gary Eugene’s interview with Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) investigators, which was obtained by New Times Tuesday.

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